Lorde Storms Toward The Throne Of Pop Music

But when choosing her stage name, Yelich-O’Connor sought out a royal-sounding moniker, inspired by her childhood obsession with aristocracy, “something that has always fascinated me. Everything that happened to a royal family in, like, the 17th century is just absurd, but cool.” She added the silent “e” at the end of “Lord” for a feminine touch. She signed a development deal with Universal Records at age 12 after an artists and repertoire rep saw video of her performing in her school talent show. But things didn’t really get going until she partnered with co-writer Joel Little and released her EP, The Love Club, on music-streaming site SoundCloud for free last year. (It was officially released by Universal in March.) She’s arriving stateside for an eight-date U.S. tour that kicks off tonight in Los Angeles, and her full-length debut, Pure Heroine, is out Monday (now streaming at VH1). “The (new) record is quite different from the EP, musically, in that I just have kind of grown up a bit since I wrote the EP. I’m better at making beats and writing songs and stuff,” she says with a laugh. “The material feels more mature. I think it’s way better than the EP.” True to her philosophy of keeping things simple, Pure Heroine is “not a super-long record,” she says. With 10 songs, including Royals and Tennis Court, it clocks in at 37 minutes. “I hate it when albums drag,” she says. She says she didn’t let the pressure of hurtling success affect the recording process of Pure Heroine. In fact, it was “quite a stress-free process,” she says coolly, as if there were really no other way to go about it. If she fits in with any stereotype of her age group, it’s that Lorde is an avid social media user, connecting with fans through Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr and other platforms.

Music Review: Kings of Leon tame themselves in 6th studio album, ‘Mechanical Bull’

Pierluigi Lugano, an Abissi wine maker, checks a Primat, a bottle that contains 27 litres of sparkling wine that was brought to the surface by scuba divers on September 25, 2013 in Chiavari. Pierluigi Lugano is experimenting by storing his wine three to four years in the sea at a depth of 60 metres and some 3 kilometres offshore, where the water temperature remains constant under 6 bars of pressure with a slight deepwater current. 
AFP PHOTO / OLIVIER MORINOLIVIER MORIN/AFP/Getty Images

By Associated Press, Three years after the Kings of Leons last record, the edgy, gravely rock foursome return in top shape with Mechanical Bull. The album takes the bands unique sound the recognizable longing guitars and Caleb Followills growl and adds a hint of melancholy and a stillness that gives the songs an aura of contentment. Looking for things to do? Select one or more criteria to search Kid-friendly Get ideas Nervy desire and wildness is still present in their music, most prominently in Tonight, with its sexy vibes of earlier hits that hinted at mad tumbling into lust, and in the obsessive strummings of Wait for Me. The playful notes of the first single, Supersoaker, set the tone, adding a sense of giddiness to the proceedings. Dont Matter goes full-on rock in the beginning but is gradually imbued with a hint of Billy Joel. Temple starts out noisily and morphs into the confident stage presence of a rock star. Beautiful War rounds up the sound with a heartfelt ballad that showcases Calebs voice. And Family Tree sounds like an old man trying to give advice to the young, who think they know better than everyone else. Despite tackling the familiar themes of drunken nights and tentative love, the songs weave the story of a man who knows the meaning of being lost and who has finally been found. Mechanical Bull isnt the anguished edgy ride youd expect from Kings of Leon but a fun, stirring experience you dont want to end. ____ Follow Cristina Jaleru on Twitter: Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.