How Women Can Save The World By Telling Epic Stories In The Movies

The Man Who Brought Beatles, Bond & More to Movies

It really doesn’t. All you need is the introduction to the monster. Watch the first forty-five seconds of this clip and it won’t make a difference how many fake spiders they wave around in the finale. You’re still (shamefacedly) scared. And you’ll never go to the circus again. 4. Tremors (1990) I’m not saying it scares you all the time. I’m just willing to bet that, after watching this movie, you spent a little time looking over the plan of your house and wondering if you could hop from one piece of furniture to the next without the graboids getting you. Ha! 3. The Entity (1983) S Remember being scared by Poltergeist?

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Nations and peoples flourish when they adopt cosmopolitan ideals. One thinks of Elizabethan England, Gupta India, Renaissance Florence, and Tang Dynasty China at the height of the Silk Road. These were eras when travel and trade linked together many fascinating cultures and peoples, and great art and innovation were the result. For women today, being cosmopolitan means being open to the world, to innovation, to new possibilities. It means not being held back by outmoded ideas of what a woman’s place should be, or what kinds of stories a woman should tell on the big screen. In keeping with this spirit, the audience at Social Media Week LA strongly agreed when I suggested that female filmmakers should not be confined to just romantic comedies and chamber dramas. We should have the opportunity to write and direct grand historical epics, ambitious sci-fi films, imaginative fantasy-adventures, huge comic book movies, sweeping literary adaptations, and much more. It’s by leading such big cinematic efforts that women can make their greatest mark in reshaping the culture. And this reshaping of culture is very much needed today. On a technical level we are more cosmopolitan than ever before, with our greater connectivity to everyone else on the planet (and even the galaxy, with Voyager 1 now leaving the solar system) — but our thinking is not equally broad-minded and cosmopolitan. Despite all our advances in digital communication, the peoples of the world are as riven as ever by conflicts between races, genders, religions, and cultures. I was tremendously proud a few weeks ago that America, a nation that I love for its revolutionary ideals of freedom and democracy, would welcome the first Miss America of Indian descent, Nina Davuluri. But then came a heartbreaking wave of racism and bigotry against her.

9 Movies You Should Be Ashamed To Be Afraid Of

9 Movies You Should Be Ashamed To Be Afraid Of

along with recruiting legendary filmmakers Federico Fellini, Ingmar Bergman, Francois Truffaut, Louis Malle and Sergio Leone. At Paramount, he shepherded such classics as Saturday Night Fever, Grease, Heaven Can Wait, Cheech and Chong’s Up in Smoke and Ordinary People. At Lorimar, he was responsible for such films as An Officer and a Gentleman, Being There, Escape to Victory and S.O.B. At Columbia, his fingerprints are all over Punchline, Hope and Glory and The Last Emperor. As an independent producer, he made the Steve Martin/Carl Reiner-directed The Jerk, Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid and The Man with Two Brains, plus Beat Street and The Crucible with Daniel Day-Lewis, among others. On the TV side, he set up Arli$$ and such miniseries as P.T. Barnum and The Tempations. As for capturing the Beatles before they broke out, Picker explains, “Through sheer good luck, we wound up having a three-picture deal with this group. We made a low-budget movie deal with a rock group because we thought they were kind of good but they hadn’t broken beyond their local market [in Liverpool]. [After they became a sensation in London], I walked into my boss’s office and said, ‘Guess what? We’ve got the Beatles.’ Now the question is, what do you do with them?” Picker takes credit for having the idea of matching up the band with filmmaker Richard Lester to create their first legendary film in 1964: “I honestly believe A Hard Day’s Night would not have been made had I not seen this short [by Richard Lester] called The Running Jumping Standing Still. It was a marriage of two talents, Dick Lester and the Beatles, who had a vision and made it work.” Related: McCartney: Yoko Didn’t Break Up Beatles As for Bond, Picker was an avid fan of Ian Fleming’s work and tried to get the ball rolling with Alfred Hitchcock directing a 007 adaptation, but Fleming didn’t like movies and didn’t want his creation ruined onscreen. Later, the author changed his tune and gave Cubby Broccolli and Harry Saltzman the option to produce his novels.