Can The Santa Monica Pier Become A Great Concert Venue?

Concert review: The Knights display deeply committed musicmaking skills

An artisan gives finishing touches to an effigy of demon king Ravana in preparation for the upcoming Hindu festival of Dussehra in the northern Indian city of Chandigarh October 8, 2013. The effigies are burnt during the festival which commemorates the triumph of Lord Rama over Ravana, marking the victory of good over evil. REUTERS/Ajay Verma (INDIA - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

The Way Over Yonder festival is a step forward, they say. Comments 3 Los Angeles concert promoters Mitchell Frank, left, and Martin Fleischmann are bringing concerts and festivals to the Santa Monica Pier. (Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times / September 26, 2013) Also By Mikael Wood October 5, 2013, 7:00 a.m. A stiff breeze blew across the Santa Monica Pier on a recent afternoon, kicking up sand and sea spray as visitors munched fried food and watched a man paint names on a grain of rice. But sheltered inside a seafood joint, Mitchell Frank and Martin Fleischmann didn’t seem concerned with the weather perhaps because they were busy describing winds of change. “What we’re trying to do is create a destination for locals on the pier,” said Fleischmann, a veteran Los Angeles concert promoter. “Tourists are here all day long, but otherwise it’s underutilized.” Added Frank, another promoter hired by the nonprofit group that oversees the pier, “The mandate was to bring content here.” PHOTOS: Concerts by The Times Content in the form of musical performances isn’t unheard of on the pier, which last month wrapped its 29th annual Twilight Concert series with a free show by the reggae star Jimmy Cliff. The gig drew 30,000 people, according to some estimates. But this year the promoters expanded the menu with a slate of ticketed festivals, including All Bands on Deck! (with indie acts such as Poolside and Yacht) and September’s Beach Ball (featuring Aloe Blacc and Sly & Robbie). This weekend the pier is to host Way Over Yonder, an inaugural two-day roots-music event connected to the venerable Newport Folk Festival with performances Saturday and Sunday by Neko Case, Conor Oberst and Calexico.

Analysis: Jackson case will change the tune for concert, artist insurance

Founded by two brothers, veterans of Yo-Yo Mas genre-bending Silk Road project, the Knights gave sizzling performances of classics by Bach, Haydn and Stravinsky. It is a joy to see such deeply committed musicmaking. The Knights have no conductor; only the bassoonist and cellists play seated; every player is viscerally caught up in the shape of every phrase. That they suggest a rock band is not accidental, but the precision of balance and ensemble bespeaks the highest level of musicianship and preparation. Looking for things to do? Select one or more criteria to search Kid-friendly Get ideas It is unfortunate that the string soloists play with a thin, quasi-baroque sound (unlike their woodwind colleagues); this affect marred the Bach concerto for oboe and violin and the Haydn Le Soir symphony. Given the energy and spirit everywhere else, this counts as just a quibble, but it is odd that so many excellent, conservatory-trained artists prioritize beauty of sound lower today than they used to. The concert concluded with two unclassifiable works: a Concerto for Santur and Violin by Colin Jacobsen and Siamak Aghaei (a santur is an Iranian hammer dulcimer) and . . . the ground beneath our feet, apparently a group composition by the entire ensemble. The concerto hung together a little better (having fewer cooks than the second piece), though it was still a mish-mash of Middle East and West, including places where the concerto seemed like a Disney movie soundtrack and ending with a kind of Iranian tarantella. The final work was truly a Mulligan stew, an attempt at blending every kind of non-classical music that each member felt like tossing in Irish bebop; Indian calypso; Peter, Paul & Mary; and so on.

Concert photos by the L.A. Times

The companies initially refused to pay Spears for losses arising from the canceled shows, claiming she failed to disclose surgery performed on her knee five years earlier. Spears had passed the insurance company’s required medical exam a year before the tour was to begin. John Callagy, attorney for Spears in the case, told Reuters it became apparent the insurance companies were aware of her prior knee injuries from earlier insurance applications. Mary Thompson, president of Las Vegas-based Capstone Brokerage, said she expects Spears probably bought “contingency insurance” for her Planet Hollywood residency but now it includes new stipulations following the pop star’s widely publicized breakdown a few years go. Tougher drug use monitoring and higher insurance pricing arose after 23-year-old actor River Phoenix died in 1993 of a drug overdose while under contract for two movies. When he died, two insurance companies paid nearly $5.7 million to the producers of “Dark Blood” and “Interview With the Vampire,” but then sued his estate in a federal court in Florida to get their money back, claiming he violated his contracts by lying when he said he did not do drugs. The court ruled against the insurers, which then appealed the ruling. An appeals court in Florida then granted the Phoenix estate’s motion to dismiss the insurer’s claims, ruling the actor’s death rendered his performance impossible, an event which was covered by the insurance policy. “As a result of this case, the insurance companies became more careful about how they priced contracts and covered performers they deemed risky,” said Zev Jacob Eigen, associate professor of Law at Northwestern University School of Law. “The Jackson case stands to be another cause for recalibration in the industry because it impacts the same questions about scope of coverage and obligation to monitor behaviors of performers,” said Eigen. Stars themselves may be rushing to their insurance brokers as well. Performers like Spears often buy a “personal policy” to protect their “industry value” in case they can no longer perform. “Famous singers often insure their voices and you can only imagine the body parts that porn stars might be insuring,” said Eigen.

Baldwin Pops Concert to be held at the Orange Beach Senior Center on Oct. 20

Both the symphonic band and concert band are composed of both music and non-music majors who underwent a competitive blind audition in order to participate. The upcoming concert is not only an opportunity for students to enjoy a performance put on by their peers, but a chance to highlight the musical talents of several UA students. The concert will showcase the talents of many students from various backgrounds, ages, majors and experience, as well as highlight musical selections that are vibrant, aggressive, soulful and fun, Todd said. With their performance, the two bands seek to engage people of all musical preferences, from contemporary pop to rock to classical, while simultaneously dispelling the connotation associated with symphonic and concert bands. When people hear the terms symphonic band and concert band, they automatically think of older, classical music, Randall Coleman, associate director of bands and conductor of the symphonic and concert bands, said. This presents a challenge since most college students prefer to listen to new songs on the radio. However, I think our program successfully encompasses many different musical tastes by providing fast-paced, contemporary music thats easy to listen to. Similarly, Todd said the symphonic bands and concert bands are much more relatable than most people realize. They are not limited to older music, and students will be surprised to find that many of the pieces in the concert will be familiar to them. This concert will provide sounds that are familiar and recognizable, as well as some that are new and different, Todd said. The overarching goal of the concert is to promote the Alabama symphonic band and Alabama concert band, and by extension the music program as a whole. The concert allows the bands an outlet for their hard work, and ticket sales will benefit the music program. Weve worked hard to present a quality program, and we wont disappoint, Christopher Henley, a freshman majoring in organ performance and a guest member of the symphonic band, said. The concert will be held Monday at 7:30 p.m. in the concert hall of Moody Music Building. Tickets for the event are $10 for general admission, $5 for senior citizens, and $3 for students and can be purchased at uamusic.tix.com.

Concert to feature new, familiar pieces

20 View/Post Comments Baldwin Pops performed on stage at a previous concert. (Submitted by Jeanne Fitzgibbons) The City of Orange Beach will be hosting a free concert featuring the Baldwin Pops Concert Band. The event will be held Oct. 20 from 4:306:00 p.m. on the lawn behind the Orange Beach Senior Center & Library, located at 26251 Canal Road. This will be the Pops fifth year to hold a concert in Orange Beach. For this event, both the Senior Center and Library will be open, making for easy access to those who may use wheelchairs or walkers. Plenty of restroom facilities will be available. The Senior Center & Library are located on Wolf Bay and offer a waterfront view with beautiful sunsets this time of year. For the past four years the concert has been held at Waterfront Park, which is only a few hundred feet from this years venue. The location has been changed due to construction at the Coastal Arts Center. These improvements will allow the grounds to better accommodate events like this in the future. Parking will still be available at Waterfront Park for the Pops Concert. Everyone is encouraged to bring lawn chairs, blankets, picnics and beverages.