Avicii’s ‘wake Me Up’ Becomes One Of Uk’s Biggest Selling Singles Of All Time

New Issue Out Now: Featuring The Strokes / Blur / White Lies / Iggy Pop

As cybercrime continues to prove a lucrative way for hackers to steal valuable data for profit or as part of state-sponsored jobs — and many governments struggle to catch up and protect networks adequately against rising attacks — defense budget funds now need to not only consider physical threats, but digital warfare as well. Hammond commented: “Last year our cyber defenses blocked around 400,000 advanced malicious cyber threats against the government’s secure internet alone, so the threat is real. But simply building cyber defenses is not enough: as in other domains of warfare, we also have to deter. Britain will build a dedicated capability to counterattack in cyberspace and if necessary to strike in cyberspace.” In February, the National Audit Office named “addressing the UK’s current and future ICT and cybersecurity skills gap” as a “key challenge.” The NAO report was published as part of the UK’s 650 million pound ($1.09 billion) Cyber Security Strategy scheme, and said it could take “20 years” to address the skills gap at all levels of education. Not only could a dedicated task force of offensive security experts deter hackers in the future, but the Defence Secretary told the Mail on Sunday that cyberstrikes could work “alongside conventional weapons in future conflicts,” disabling communications, nuclear weapons, ships and critical hardware. To establish the new cybersecurity force, the UK will recruit experts in their hundreds from a number of fields. The recruitment drive will include civilian computer experts who will be part of the “Joint Cyber Reserve,” and their role will be to work alongside members of the Ministry of Defence and GCHQ to protect critical infrastructure and prevent data theft. The cost of the program was not disclosed, but recruitment is due to begin in October. Hammond commented : “Increasingly, our defense budget is being invested in high-end capabilities such as cyber and intelligence and surveillance assets to ensure we can keep the country safe. The cyber reserves will be an essential part of ensuring we defend our national security in cyber-space. This is an exciting opportunity for Internet experts in industry to put their skills to good use for the nation, protecting our vital computer systems and capabilities.” The UK is also seeking ways to train the next generation of cyberspecialists. In May, two UK universities — Oxford and Royal Holloway — were granted 7.5 million pounds in funding to help develop the country’s skills in online security.

Google UK Ltd’s Tax Rate Was Actually 83.8% Of Profits So What Were The Guardian Talking About?

According to the Official Charts Company , the 24-year-old Swedish producer and DJ’s track broke through the million copies sales barrier this morning (October 6). The track is the 140th single to reach this milestone in British chart history, and the third to do so this year after Daft Punk ‘s ‘Get Lucky’ and Robin Thicke’s ‘Blurred Lines’. ‘Wake Me Up’ debuted in at Number One in the Official UK Singles Chart back in in July, and it became the fastest selling single of 2013 after shifting 267,000 copies in its first week on sale. The song then spent three consecutive weeks at the top. “Having the fastest selling record of 2013 is obviously a huge deal to me,” Avicii told BBC Radio 1’s Official Chart Show host Jameela Jamil at the time. “I never thought being on the Official Chart was an option for my music. Dance music has its own things; we have our own charts and lists, so just having a Number One is insane!” In related news, Snow Patrol s ‘Chasing Cars’ has also broken through the million sales mark. The track, which was originally released in 2006, has re-entered the Official Singles Chart on an almost annual basis, climbing back into the Top 75 in six out of the last seven years. Elton John s double A-side ‘Something About The Way You Look Tonight / Candle In The Wind ’97’ remains the UKs biggest selling single of all-time. It has sold nearly 5 million copies since its release sixteen years ago. You can see the full list of the UKs 140 Official Million Selling Singles here .

UK gears up for cyberwarfare offensives

Photo: ITV Exposure Religious leaders appeared willing to agree to perform underage marriages at some mosques across the UK, an ITV investigation has discovered. Two undercover reporters called 56 mosques for Exposure to ask whether they would perform the marriage of a 14-year-old girl. Two-thirds of those contacted refused to perform the marriage, and many of them made clear they found the request abhorrent. But 18 of the respondents spoken to agreed. An undercover reporter called the Al Quba Mosque and Shahporan Islamic centre, in Manchester, posing as a single mother who wanted to have an Islamic marriage, known as a nikah, for her 14-year-old daughter. The Imam at this mainstream mosque, with a congregation of one thousand, told her “that’s not going to be a problem”. The Al Quba Mosque and Shahporan Islamic centre and the Imam were approached for comment but have not responded to the programme. Around 400 schoolchildren mainly girls from South Asian communities – are forced into marriage every year in the UK, according to official Government figures. The vast majority of forced marriages of British children happen abroad, according to official statistics. But the Exposure investigation has been told by experts in the field that children as young as 10 are being forced into marriage in the UK. “Meera” said she was married in the UK when she was 15-years-old. She told the programme she found the experience so devastating that she has not been able to tell her friends or family, and she remains trapped in her forced marriage, 40 years on. Nazir Afzal, Chief Crown Prosecutor for the CPS North West, told Exposure that “forced marriage is probably the last form of slavery in the UK”.

UK Imams agree to perform underage marriages

Google UK said in its latest accounts that it earned pre-tax profits of 37m on a turnover of 506m. The thing is, Google didnt pay 11.6 million in tax on that 37 million profit. Its paid 30.8 million in tax on that profit of 37 million for a tax rate of 83.8%. The actual accounts I have here. And as you can see the numbers The Guardian are using are simply wrong. The reason why theyre wrong is also simple enough to explain. Google was expensing certain of the stock awards that theyve made to staff. HMRC has, possibly correctly, insisted that these are not in fact tax-deductible expenses. They might well be correct under IFRS but theyre not under the tax rules: therefore previous tax deductions taken have to be reversed and the tax paid. Which is how Google UK Ltd is in fact paying an 83.8% tax rate in a country where the headline tax rate is 24% (for the year under discussion). Even if you ignore that the rate is still over 31%. What appears to have happened is that The Guardian filed its report about the tax bill they day before Google actually filed the accounts with Companies House.