A Womanly Reign Awaits With Katy Perry, Lady Gaga, Icona Pop Albums

A jury can decide whether Gaga’s demands left Jennifer O’Neill any personal time or whether she was on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week, as she claimed in her 2011 lawsuit, U.S. District Judge Paul Gardephe said. A trial is set for Nov. 4. O’Neill worked for the singer for one to two months in early 2009 and for 13 months beginning in February 2010, and the judge said both sides agree she was expected to be available as needed throughout each hour of each day. Gardephe ruled that O’Neill’s “on-call” time potentially qualifies for overtime compensation. O’Neill said she was paid at a flat rate of about $50,000 annually when she was first hired and $75,000 annually the second time by the pop singer, who is estimated in a list published by Forbes magazine to have earned $80 million in the first six months of this year. Lawyers did not immediately comment. In his written decision, Gardephe noted that lawyers said Lady Gaga, listed in the litigation under her birth name Stefani Germanotta and O’Neill frequently slept in the same bed because O’Neill never had her own hotel room while on tour and was required to address Lady Gaga’s needs throughout the night. O’Neill had testified in a deposition that if Lady Gaga was watching a DVD in the middle of the night and grew tired of it, she woke her up to take out and replace the DVD. “Every day is a work day for her, so every day is a work day for the rest of us,” she said. “There is no, `We’re going to stay in, we’re going to sleep.’ There is no, `Let’s put on sweatpants and go out to the movies and be girlfriends.’ It doesn’t work like that,” O’Neill said. In her deposition testimony, Lady Gaga had testified: “You don’t get a schedule.

Lady Gaga Going to Trial in Ex-Assistant’s ‘On-Call’ Lawsuit

4. O’Neill worked for the singer for one to two months in early 2009 and for 13 months beginning in February 2010. The judge said both sides agree she was expected to be available as needed throughout each hour of each day. PHOTOS: Lady Gagas Most Memorable Fashion Moments Gardephe ruled that O’Neill’s “on-call” time potentially qualifies for overtime compensation. O’Neill said she was paid at a flat rate of about $50,000 annually when she was first hired and $75,000 annually the second time by the pop singer, who is estimated in a list published by Forbes magazine to have earned $80 million in the first six months of this year. Lawyers did not immediately comment. In his written decision, Gardephe noted that lawyers said Lady Gaga, listed in the litigation under her birth name — Stefani Germanotta — and O’Neill frequently slept in the same bed because O’Neill never had her own hotel room while on tour and was required to address Lady Gaga’s needs throughout the night. O’Neill had testified in a deposition that if Lady Gaga was watching a DVD in the middle of the night and grew tired of it, she woke her up to take out and replace the DVD. PHOTOS: VMAs 2013: Best and Worst Moments “Every day is a work day for her, so every day is a work day for the rest of us,” she said. “There is no, ‘We’re going to stay in, we’re going to sleep.’ There is no, ‘Let’s put on sweatpants and go out to the movies and be girlfriends.’ It doesn’t work like that,” O’Neill said. In her deposition testimony, Lady Gaga had testified: “You don’t get a schedule.

It also set the stage for a resurgence this fall of female pop stars. At the forefront of that charge are Perry, whose album “Prism” is due out Oct. 22, and Lady Gaga, who’s set to release her latest, “Artpop,” on Nov. 11. (“Applause,” the lead single from Lady Gaga’s album, cracked the top 5 last month.) But a feisty crew of other acts looms right behind those titans: On Oct. 8, Miley Cyrus , whose recent performance at MTV’s Video Music Awards actually drew more notice than either Perry’s or Lady Gaga’s, will unleash “Bangerz,” which promises to complete her transition from Disney Channel sweetheart to twerk-happy enfant terrible. And M.I.A., the globe-tripping digital-punk agitator, is to return Nov. 5 with “Matangi,” her follow-up to 2010’s polarizing “Maya.” PHOTOS: Concerts by The Times Slightly lower profile but no less energetic, the Swedish duo Icona Pop known to American listeners for its gleefully profane electro-rave hit “I Love It” has a U.S. debut set to arrive in stores Sept. 24 that includes at least one cut in which Aino Jawo and Caroline Hjelt threaten to “smash the club.” In April, Icona Pop’s London-based pal Charli XCX (who co-wrote and appears on “I Love It”) released her own stateside debut, the lurid “True Romance”; on Nov. 4, she’ll stop by L.A.’s El Rey Theatre, not long after Sky Ferreira, whose beguiling “Ghost” EP came out late last year, plays the same venue Sept.